Saturday, September 19, 2009

Let's revisit the Medium-Format DSLRs now that the K-7 and K-x are available. Could the 645D be Pentax's next big move?


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Hi Pentaxian friends.

I just thought that this article published in July was appropriate now that Pentax has the K-7 and the K-x available.

Pentax will never make a Full Frame (24x36) DSLR as they believe this is a market that will disapear in favor of much larger sensors. As the prices of sensors goes down and technology advances even more, sensors equivalent to medium-format cameras will be cheaper.

Pentax has experience with medium-format cameras in the 645 and 6x7 film cameras. They already have a good lens base. They are going to introduce the new Pentax 645-D in Japan early next year. It will not be only sold in Japan for long. I bet everybody will want one and the price will never be as much as the competition such as Hasselblad, Phase One, Mamiya, etc.

Just look at the Leica S2, and you will look at the future of Digital Photography. Canon and Nikon never produced a medium-format camera before and they will likely continue to push the Full Frame format inherited from the 35mm film cameras. Imagine a sensor the size of a 645 medium-format camera or bigger. The point and shoot cameras will be replaced by APS-C DSLRs or 4/3rd DSLRs or Hybrid cameras. The Full frame will be replaced by the medium-format sizes.

This will put Pentax in a good position for both markets. You know that the Leica S2 will start a new Professional standard, but at a much higher price than Pentax will. You just wait and see...Pentax will rise again. In the past, with film cameras, the 35mm was mostly used by amateur photographers and Large-format by Pros.
Here is another article I posted earlier about the Pentax 645-D.

What do you think?

Of course this is just my opinion only and I am 90% right 20% of the time, like the weather man!
Thank you for reading,

Yvon Bourque
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